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Background, Designers, Buildings & Monuments, Showrooms, Exhibits, Green, Hotels & Bars, Seen on a tradeshow

Lacroix dresses-up the 1664 Brew

Submitted by A-PP on Mon, 2012-09-17 19:54

To kick-off the September 2012 Tradeshow season and welcome the Parisians back from their August-long summer vacations, Kronenbourg has asked Christian Lacroix to dress-up its cans of 1664 beer.

The Lacroix-Brew turns out to be an excellent conversation starter during social gatherings, especially after a full day on Maison&Objet (M&O) in Paris.

Date of publication: 
13
September
2012

The "homo urbanicus" and his balcony

Submitted by A-PP on Wed, 2012-06-27 10:40

 

In 2008, the United Nations published a report stating that over 50% of the world population now lives in an urban environment. Visiting world capital cities, it is striking how some cities seem more crowded than others. Actually, population density is uneven. For instance, Manhattan and Paris, count respectively 27 152 inhabitants/km² or 70 323 inhabitants /mi² and 21 196 inhabitants /Km² or 54 899 inhabitants /mi². In comparison, London and Los Angeles only count respectively 4 984 inhabitants /Km² or 12 909 inhabitants /mi² and 803 inhabitants /km² or 2 081 inhabitants /mi².

In Paris, the increase in population density has impacted how balconies are integrated into everyday life. Balconies no longer seem to be simply used as “shelves” for geraniums. Rather they are mostly turned into gardens, while a few are stacked with bamboos or lush plants to build a screen. As for the larger balconies, they are designed so that life can be enjoyed from above…

And naturally, the concept has been applied to full scale architectural projects. For example: architect Édouard François built the « Tower-Flower » in 2004 in Asnières, just across the Paris periphérique. On all balconies, of the building’s façade, François has hung giant flower pots, with bamboos shooting up to the next floor, discreetly rustling in the wind.

Date of publication: 
27
June
2012

Monumenta 2012 - Daniel Buren

Submitted by A-PP on Tue, 2012-06-26 23:58

This year, Grand Palais invited artist Daniel Buren for its Monumenta exhibit. The dimensions of the Grand Palais are such, that the techniques developed in 1900 to build the steel and glass roof, were later applied to erect the Eiffel Tower. At such a scale, the artist is challenged with a monumental open-space.

As I entered the exhibit, Buren’s production put a happy smile on my face. Every time the sun managed to push a ray of bright light through the rainy 2012 spring Parisian skies, my smile would grow, while the children all across the space would start screaming in excitement, the mothers not caring the less.

Date of publication: 
26
June
2012

The impression received when entering the BULGARI Hotel in London, is that everything is in the place it is meant to be, and nothing is left to randomly sit or stand around. Exactly as would be expected of a carefully engineered mechanic. And looking at the geometrical lay-out of the stone slabs, a thought comes to mind: are the varying sizes of the slabs only meant to build harmony within the space, or did the architect include a code?

Date of publication: 
13
June
2012

Another striking fact about the BULGARI Hotel in London is how texture is used. Black-unpolished stone pave the floors. Glossy-varnished dark-mahogany dress-up the walls. And mat-silver draperies cover the windows. Those dark toned materials serve as a back-drop for the chrome furniture, the colorful rugs, bright green bouquets, and the bar in shinning silver… Penetrating the lobby, the visitor navigates with no hesitation to the desired spot.

Date of publication: 
13
June
2013

BULGARI London - Using materials to build identity

Submitted by A-PP on Thu, 2012-06-14 02:48

Most striking when visiting the new BULGARI Hotel in London is the quality of the materials used. The façade is covered with Portland stone as a hint to Buckingham Palace and to Saint Paul's the Cathedral. Inside, mahogany is extensively used as Italian RIVA did on its luxury power-boats; and chrome/silver reminds of the early days of BULGARY as silversmiths… The London BULGARI Hotel is a breed of palace hotel designed with codes applied in places like TriBeCA, SoHo… by those who refurbish XIXth century industrial brick buildings into residences: clean open spaces, contrasting textures and understated luxury.

Date of publication: 
13
June
2012

Félix Agostini - Sconces

Submitted by A-PP on Tue, 2012-05-15 20:58

These sconces by Félix Agostini were seen on “Les Puces du Design.” French born Agostini was a sculptor. He started his career as a print designer. His works include printed fabrics for Channel, and the lighting collection “Echassier” –Wading Bird- homage to Diego Giacometti with whom he had worked on joint projects.

Date of publication: 
15
May
2012

Sergio Rodrigues – “Kilin” armchairs

Submitted by A-PP on Tue, 2012-05-15 10:09

These "Kilin" armchairs by Sergio Rodrigues were for sale at “Les Puces du Design.” Boasting a solid wood structure with leather slingback seat, these chairs evoke Brazilian furniture design, eponymous ever since Rodrigues’ influence, of relaxed attitude and lifestyle.

Date of publication: 
15
May
2012

Paul R. Evans - “Cityscape Series”

Submitted by A-PP on Mon, 2012-05-14 17:57

This "Cityscape series" table by Paul R. Evans was for sale at “Les Puces du Design.” Paul Evans was an American born residential furniture designer, sculptor, and artist. In the 1970’, he contributed to the American craft Movement, and influenced American furniture design, with his creations of metal, which set him apart.

Paul R. Evans was particularly notorious for making sure each piece of furniture be made by hand, one piece at a time, and supervised by the artist.

Date of publication: 
14
May
2012

Preserving old Jeddah

Submitted by admin on Wed, 2012-04-25 10:53

Old Jeddah is worth discovering!  An accumulation of intertwining streets bordered with old facades, old Jeddah is home to various markets for textiles and fabrics, food stuffs of all kinds including honey from the Himalayas, perfumes and spices, etc. 

Old Jeddah is what has been spared by a forceful march towards modernity, a testimony of a time not so long ago, that artist Safeya Binzagr, the first Saudi woman to take a stand as an artist, painted in all its rich and colorful details. 

With a building activity growing by up to 20% every year, Jeddah seems to strongly position itself among the leading cities in the region for the 21st century, and even in the global arena, with the world’s next tallest tower due to be completed in 2017 according to unofficial sources.  Let simply hope that the race towards “who has the tallest building” does not turn Jeddah into yet another regional city-sized-shopping center, but that the Jeddah officials understand the necessity to preserve architectural and urban gems from the past.

Date of publication: 
25
April
2012
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