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Background, Designers, Buildings & Monuments, Showrooms, Exhibits, Green, Hotels & Bars, Seen on a tradeshow

Store design

Submitted by admin on Mon, 2012-04-23 12:25

How do you decorate to show case your product or trade?  Whether in the food markets of Jeddah (UAE) or in the streets or bars of Paris (France) a simple technique seems to do the trick in a fairly elegant fashion: repetition! 

It is the juxtaposition of the product that seems to work, more or less depending on how conscious the designer is.  What do you think?

Date of publication: 
23
April
2012

Bubbles and Balls

Submitted by admin on Fri, 2012-04-20 10:46

Philippe Starck, while redesigning the bar at the Royal Monceau-Raffles in Paris, included some Japanese refinement to rethink one essential detail of a modern luxury bar: the ice-cube!

Scotch is no longer served on-the-rocks, but on-the-ball. Beware however; abuse could soften your brightness!

Date of publication: 
20
April
2012

Lalique’s crystal door

Submitted by admin on Fri, 2012-03-23 13:20

Designing his Paris home and showroom back in 1902, René Lalique made sure guests and friends would step right into the Lalique world as they were about to push open the door into the building.

The building's Art Nouveau style is clearly identifiable by a glimpse at the façade and its pine tree sculptures. The Lalique touch discreetly becomes overwhelmingly present as you approach the entrance. Sculpted crystal tiles extend the pattern on the stone façade. 

Pine tree branches sculpted in crystal seem to cover the door, thus creating a sense of depth. And pushing open the door feels like penetrating under the cover of pine trees, into a different world.

Date of publication: 
23
March
2012

Reinventing the Balmain Showroom

Submitted by admin on Mon, 2011-11-28 20:30

Balmain !  The name evokes style and fashion with a tradition, and memories of movie stars pop up: Marlene Dietrich, Katharine Hepburn, Brigitte Bardot, Sophia Loren... Actually, it seems that not so long ago, the elegant Parisian couture house prided itself of discretion, and was reluctant to generate any kind of buzz. This all changed in 2006, when Christophe Decarnin, the new Style Director, revamped the brand while keeping it true to its roots and giving it a “chic rocker” style. Decarnin’s effect seems to have had a strong impact on the celebrities in Hollywood. No wonder Avatar star Zoe Saldana often wears Balmain at the premieres of her movies, raising each time a roar of “ooh La La J’adore!” by star gazers.

Naturally, Decarnin had to do something about the historical showroom located on 44, rue François 1er, next to the Champs Elysées. To reflect the spirit of his “chic rocker” style, Decarnin found his alter ego in interior designer and architect Joseph Dirand. Not a surprise, as Dirand has received a lot of press for the Habita MTY, hotel in Monterrey he co-designed with architect Augustin Landa, and Wallpaper* distinguished the design team with the best New Hotel award in 2010. Today, appealing to a public beyond the Bling-Blings of Hollywood and the posh British journalists, the “chic rocker” style is making a hit in the conservative valeys of the Berkshires. Dirand has been invited to decorate Teddy Wharton’s Bathroom at The Mount’s 2011 Showcase of French Design.

On rue François 1er, the Decarnin-Dirand team have designed an interior meant to evoke both the spirit of a traditional Parisian interior combined with Decarnin’s “chic rocker” style. The look is clean, yet traditional. Plaster moldings replicate design elements found on the façades of the city’s monuments. Those moldings evoke the elegance of Paris’ streets and of its interiors. A slick coat of shiny white paint on the walls and ceilings plus the bleached oak parquet, give it an overall contemporary, cutting-edge feel. In addition, furniture by masters of the 40s -Gilbert Poillerat, André Arbus, Jean Royère- have been mixed in with Dirand’s own creations. Manufacturers invited on the project where handpicked. POUENAT Ferronnier was selected to manufacture the metal work: furniture, lighting and architectural elements. Among the most spectacular are the stair case and the entrance. POUENAT Ferronnier will be presenting its creations at « Maison France » in New York City at the Felissimo Design House on 56th Street from the 21st to the 25th of June.

Photos by Régis d'Hauteville

Date of publication: 
1
June
2010

'Maison France'

Submitted by admin on Mon, 2011-11-28 20:15

Where do you go to find inspiration? Our previous newsletter recommended you visit manufacturers during tradeshows. New York based design firms are in luck! Starting on Monday the 21st and till the 25th of June, 30 French manufacturers are taking residency at the Felissimo Design House located at 10 West 56 Street, New York, NY 10019, during “Maison France.” Actually, the event should be considered like a boutique tradeshow for members of the Trade.

As such, this is a fantastic opportunity to build a relationship with manufacturers, who will go out of their way to provide a high level of service. Service, what does that entail? Imagine manufacturing to order. You are no longer restricted by a catalogue with predefined dimensions, colors, styles... Away with the “no not possible, this is not in our catalogue!” Rather than being preset, the catalogue here serves as a red-bull based cocktail for inspiration, unveiling trends and fashions as seen by past and current creative minds.

So why not visit “Maison France” and build up inspiration to create anew and in the spirit of…? Doing that, you might avoid spending endless hours with glossy magazines and city guides, carefully cutting out pictures, or visiting the period rooms of a national museum… You might find at “Maison France” a manufacturer with a long enough history and the corresponding catalogue along with the skill to adjust to any style. So why not tap into those sources? This is how some of those companies present themselves:

BASSAISTEGUY-MASSON specializes in the reproduction and creation of fine period French pieces of furniture. We offer our clients the possibility to benefit from the know-how of numerous artisan professionals to create quality furniture. We manufacture commonly seen pieces: chests, pedestal tables, chairs, dining tables, (etc.) as well as specific pieces such as champagne trolleys, reception desks for palaces, etc. We work with decorators and design studios, and we can adapt our production to their client's desires all around the world.

POUENAT Ferronnier's philosophy, of harnessing the expertise of the finest craftsmen in the service of great design, guides the Company's workshops as they manufacture products of the highest quality, whether standard or bespoke items, to meet the requirements of a client base made up of the leading architects and interior designers.

ULGADOR has always strived to enliven matter, through the use of a wide range of different materials. Gilding has been the main medium for the workshop’s creative spirit. The workshop has developed secret recipes and systematically applies those to give objects unusual effects and spectacular colors. Today, ULGADOR© is known for its unique procedure of oxidation and corrosion of golden, copper, silver and aluminum leaves. Decorators, Interior designers, Architects and other members of the Trade are welcome to challenge ULGADOR© in creating anew.

Exhibitors at « Maison France » are: ALAIN ST JOANIS; ATELIER MERIGUET; BASSAISTEGUY-MASSON; BRONZES DE FRANCE; DIVERSION; EGO ; ERCUIS-RAYNAUD; ELIE BLEU; HB HENRIOT FAIENCERIES DE QUIMPER; HENRYOT ET CIE; LAMELLUX; LAPPARRA; LIBERTY; LUMINAIRES LUCIEN GAU; MAISON DEGROOTE ET MUSSY; MAISON FEY; MAISON GATTI; MOISSONIER; POUENAT; REMY GARNIER; SIEGES D'ARGENTAT; TAILLARDAT; THG; TISSERANT ART AND STYLE; ULGADOR; VALOMBREUSE

Enjoy the visit and do not hesitate to add your comments to this page about the show.

Date of publication: 
1
June
2010

POUENAT and the new Metropolitan Hotel

Submitted by admin on Mon, 2011-11-28 20:02

Radisson Blu recently opened a new hotel in Paris located within walking distance from the Trocadéro and close to the Champs Elysées.  The Metropolitan’s interiors display modern lines in a cosy environment. But more exclusively, the hotel bears a signature suite with an amazing view of the Eiffel Tower.

To turn the 19th century Haussmannian town house into a haven for business travellers and jetsetters, Radisson Blu appointed interior architect and designer François Champsaur. 

Champsaur’s imagination was largely taped into, and Le Figaro’s culinary critique François Simon,

comments positively.  Simon appreciates particularly how the entire hotel offers a welcoming environment in which nothing is overbearing.

Champsaur’s level of attention to detail could only be paired by the suppliers he selected.  POUENAT Ferronier, a high-end metal workshop founded in 1880, was brought in to manufacture the architectural elements, furniture and lighting fixtures imagined by Champsaur.  The Mediterranean brasserie, the cocktail lounge, the spa, the rooms and the suites are all equipped by POUENAT.

Date of publication: 
1
June
2010

During the holiday season and till the 15th of January, the City of Lights organizes ‘Paris lights up Paris.’  The event is directed by designer Fabrice Peltier and funded by the Coca-Cola Enterprise.    The event’s purpose is to promote recycling during a time of particularly high production of wastes from packaging.  More particularly, Fabrice Peltier’s goal is to demonstrate how creative thinking can steer wastes away from the trash bin and back into the production line directly. 

Doing so, Peltier selected a packaging with a low 50% recycling rate: bottles made of pet. Rue de Richelieu and Place André Malraux were dressed up with Peltier’s creations, both located in the 1st Arrondissement near the Louvre.  200 yards of Rue de Richelieu received 22 chandeliers hanging from 10 diagonal rods all composed of multicoloured plastic bottles.

And on Place André Malraux, four 12 feet high Christmas trees were erected around the fountain.  The result is elegant at night time when all is lit up with Hotel du Louvre’s façade lit up in red as a backdrop.

SHIRALY’s thoughts:
The three partners’ recycling effort is welcome when political leaders in Copenhaguen just shied away from commitments they consider as being essential.  However, the location, the setup and the scale of the event seem totally unaligned with the event’s purpose.

 

Coca-Cola Enterprise should take a stronger stand at replacing pet bottles by something friendlier to the environment.  With the 80K€ budget it dedicated to the event according to Peltier’s website, Coca-Cola Enterprise could have certainly imagined a show both: more elegant during day time and aligned with the brand’s lifestyle ambition! 

Peltier’s position seems pragmatic and certainly stems from the fact that packaging will not evolve rapidly!  As a result, the man developed some interesting ideas.  His creations are displayed in his showroom the Designpack Gallery on rue de Richelieu, the other place selected for the event to be displayed at.

But do we really want to decorate our interiors with recycled plastic bottles, even though they look good when lit up?

It is not clear what the Paris city hall’s position is when it organises an event that does not seem to make a strong statement or is not destined to entertain.  Place André Malraux is pretty and elegant in itself.  It is off the beaten paths.  And because it is surrounded by heavy traffic, pedestrians are more likely to walk passed the event, and drivers in their cars will not even know what the event is about.  The office at Paris City hall would have been wiser to give the event a different dimension and be inspired by the Christmas trees on Broad Street, at the Rockefeller Centre or at  Bryant Park in New York City.

Date of publication: 
1
January
2010

Designing to bridge History and the Present

Submitted by admin on Mon, 2011-11-28 19:33

La Guirlande de Julie

The collaboration between Interior Architect Hubert de Givenchy (son of the fashion designer) and POUENAT Ferronnier illustrates well how linking the past to the present can be made easier. For instance, you are given an assignment: your client asks you to re-design a restaurant in one of the most exquisite and visited squares in your city, asking you to add your touch while respecting the tradition of the location. Givenchy recently completed such a project on the XVIIth Century Place des Vosges in Paris. La “Guirlande de Julie” located under the arcades surrounding Place des Vosges, happens to be a “child” restaurant to the mother ship La Tour d’Argent –once a 3 Michelin Stars holder. In addition, La Guirlande de Julie has a history of nurturing romances and in the past, hosting political intrigues.

All those details made it a more complex task to re-design the restaurant. Wisely Hubert chose POUENAT Ferronnier to design and manufacture the lighting fixtures. With POUENAT, Hubert was able to select decorative elements that matched his vision and understand how far, he could take the POUENAT production tool. A totally newly designed set of lighting fixtures was decided. The Guirlande de Julie chandeliers include arrangements of intertwined leaves -an evocation of the XVIIth century poems written to Julie by her artist and aristocrat admirers and each based on a flower, and the guirlande being the collection of those poems. The chandelier’s frame seems a copy of the plaster moldings. The lights are displayed inline… The final result is an elegant bird-like cage, with the material of the cage being subtly finished to match the roughness of the floor’s stone as well as the sophistication of the marble and the gilding on the walls. Hubert de Givenchy found in POUENAT Ferronnier a partner able to understand, interpret and produce according to his own vision and plan.

No wonder Brigitte Saby recommended POUENAT to Hubert. Brigitte Saby was among the very first to bring style back into Russia. She did so with such success that the American business press kept quoting her when commenting on the evolution of taste in Russia: NEW YORK TIMES – July 13th, 2006; INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE –July, 15th, 2006. So follow her recommendation and visit POUENAT at “<a _mce_href="http://www.shiraly.com/content/maison-france" href="http://www.shiraly.com/content/maison-france" target="_self" title="Maison France

Date of publication: 
1
June
2010

Interlace

Submitted by admin on Mon, 2011-11-28 14:41

Inspired by a medieval decorative element, this “interlace” pattern is chosen as the background element of the SHIRALY.com 2012 kick-off.  Indeed, the design is believed to match the core qualities of SHIRALY.com.  The design is discreet, yet makes a significant difference to the website.  Design Professionals will be able to promote their products and services on the website, create blogs… worry-free.

As simple as it seems, the design requires accuracy in the drawing for repeat purposes.   Similarly, the process of creating a profile, posting a blog or uploading a product has been streamlined and for more impact, a simple click can feed the information presented on the site onto your favorite social network. 

Finally, the interlace design is universal, and has been applied in architecture, decorative arts, textile design… Shiraly will be useful to those in need for marketing and sales sourcing support, as well as to those simply looking for inspiration.

Date of publication: 
1
December
2011

15cent15 at Hotel Marignan

Submitted by admin on Sun, 2011-11-27 01:05

Behind its tall Art-Deco façade, Hotel Marignan revamps the glory days of the prestigious 18th century Faussigny-Lussinge residence: with the "15cent15" lounge bar at its helm, Chef Stéphane Colé (also in charge of the well-known restaurant Spoon) opened 15cent15 last year. The celebrated lounge was designed by Olivier Gagnère, who also created the MIKADO lighting collection for Veronese.

Hotel lobby and 15cent15 lounge bar, photos: Philippe Schaff:

Date of publication: 
1
June
2007
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